Focus on: drawing

After working on our Dada self portraits in Week One, I felt I had a little insight into the children’s interests and this allowed me to set a creative theme for the kids projects through the next 9 weeks. Monday group’s theme is ‘Journeys’, Tuesdays ‘Mythical Beasts and Fairytales’ and Thursday’s is ‘Dreamings’. There’s so much material out there and in Weeks 2 and 3 we will be looking at artists such as Yayoi Kusama who use patterns or repetitive drawing systems.

On the topic of drawing, I came across a couple of articles at The Conversation about the importance of drawing in children’s cognitive development. Some key takeaways from the articles which I felt were useful in debunking some misconceptions:

  • drawing is a learned skill (not some inborn talent!) and can improve with practice and exposure (like any language I think!)
  • drawing is not only useful in art and design but helps us in other areas – for instance the surgeon Dr Francis Wells who draws before surgery as it helps him with planning and prepping for the procedure
  • drawing not only allows children to consolidate their learning, it can often be a crucial point of access, for instance the use of drawing in science lab experiments or the drawing of maps in geography

Many of the kids at The Pop are at the pre-schematic and schematic stages of drawing (making figurative blobs – this is before they start attempting ‘realistic’ depictions). This is perfect in pop art because it allows us the freedom to focus on image-making in a way that is relatable and meaningful to them. And that is an incredibly fertile and rich foundation for your child!

Article links :

https://theconversation.com/why-is-teaching-kids-to-draw-not-a-more-important-part-of-the-curriculum-60379

https://theconversation.com/want-to-improve-your-kids-writing-let-them-draw-25007

Above: Yayoi Kusama, The Little Mermaid, 2016.